An Example of Why Regional Weather Patterns Are More Important Than A Global-Average Temperature Anomaly

There is an informative article on Bloomberg News this morning titled

Snow Extends Europe Travel Chaos; UK Seeks Advice on Winter

Excerpts read

“Snow forced European airports including London Heathrow to scrap flights for a fourth day, prompting Britain to seek scientific advice on whether the heaviest early falls in 17 years show winter is turning colder.”

“Britain will ask its chief scientific adviser if blizzards that began a month ago, coupled with the worst cold snap in two decades last winter, provide evidence for a “step change” that would justify increased spending on cold-weather gear…”

“‘If we’re going to face week after week of these kinds of conditions, which I haven’t seen in my lifetime in this country, we’ll have to have different equipment, different procedures in the future,’ BAA Chief Executive Officer Colin Matthews said in an interview on Bloomberg Television”

What this article documents is that regional atmospheric circulations, rather than an annual global average temperature trend, matter in terms of the weather that directly affects society.  Even with the current global temperature anomaly above its long-term average (e.g. see), extreme cold weather (now for several winters in western Europe) will occur.

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