Teleconnections In The Earth System By Chase, Pielke and Avissar

We have a new article published which has not been reported on Climate Science. It is

Chase, T.N., R.A. Pielke Sr., and R. Avissar, 2007: Teleconnections in the Earth system. Encyclopedia of Hydrological Sciences, M. Anderson, Editor-in-Chief, John Wiley and Sons, United Kingdom, 2849-2862.

The table of the contents of the entire book can be accessed from http://www.climatesci.org/publications/pdf/CB48TOC.pdf

The abstract reads,

“This section illustrates the large-scale connectivity of the atmosphere-ocean coupled system and generalizes the concept to regional scales and to other components of the earth system. Connections at a distance, or teleconnections, can occur by the direct transfer of mass by changes in regular circulations or by propagating waves initiated by a variety of mechanisms. Questions as to what extent recognized teleconnection patterns can be associated with identifiable forcing mechanisms, to what extent these patterns are interrelated and how they might cause, react to, or interact with changing forcing such as changes in atmospheric composition, landcover, or the distribution of sea ice to produce climate changes are examined. “

We write,

“…..it appears that evidence is emerging that the climate system is coupled in a variety of complicated ways and that conceiving of variability in terms of a series of isolated teleconnection patterns may give way to a view that each of the patterns is interrelated in some way, each forcing and being forced by the others. Long chains of causality linking some or all modes of variability might improve predictability if the chains of events are regular, though past experience indicates that relationships between the modes vary with time. “

The summary of the paper states,

“This discussion illustrates the large-scale connectivity of the atmosphere-ocean coupled system and generalizes the concept to regional scales and to other components of the earth system. These connections at a distance, referred to as teleconnections, can occur by the direct transfer of mass by changes in regular circulations or by propagating waves initiated by a variety of mechanisms.

We have not discussed in detail several processes, which could rightfully be included in this section such as the regional monsoon systems, local winds, or the oceanic thermohaline circulation which, if changed, could have large climate repercussions all around the globe. We have, however, addressed the basic remaining uncertainties as to the nature of teleconnection patterns with prominent examples. Questions remain as to what extent recognized teleconnection patterns can be associated with an identifiable forcing mechanism, to what extent these patterns are interrelated and how they might cause, react to, or interact with changing forcing such as changes in atmospheric composition, landcover, or the distribution of sea ice to produce climate changes? “

This article provides further substantiation to the Climate Science weblog of July 28 2005 entitled What is the Importance to Climate of Heterogeneous Spatial Trends in Tropospheric Temperatures? where it is written

“…….regional diabatic heating due to human activities represents a major, but under-recognized climate forcing, on long-term global weather patterns. Indeed, this heterogeneous climate forcing may be more important on the weather that we experience than changes in weather patterns associated with the more homogeneous spatial radiative forcing of the well-mixed greenhouse gases.”

Comments Off on Teleconnections In The Earth System By Chase, Pielke and Avissar

Filed under Climate Change Forcings & Feedbacks

Comments are closed.