The Inaugural AASC Dissertation Award to Christopher A. Davey -Congratulations!

I am pleased to announce that Dr. Christopher A. Davey of the Desert Research Institute in Reno and with the Western Regional Climate Center was awarded the Inaugural Dissertation Medal in Applied Climatology by the American Association of State Climatologists. This recognition by his peers in the climate community is well deserved.

He has been senior author on several important contributions and his paper

Davey, C.A., R.A. Pielke Sr., and K.P. Gallo, 2006: Differences between near-surface equivalent temperature and temperature trends for the eastern United States – Equivalent temperature as an alternative measure of heat content. Global and Planetary Change, accepted,

was specifically selected as evidence of his significant research as part of his Ph.d dissertation. The abstract of the paper is

“There is currently much attention being given to the observed increase in near surface air temperatures during the last century. The proper investigation of heating trends, however, requires that we include surface heat content to monitor this aspect of the climate system. Changes in heat content of the Earth’s climate are not fully described by temperature alone. Moist enthalpy or, alternatively, equivalent temperature, is more sensitive to surface vegetation properties than is air temperature and therefore more accurately depicts surface heating trends. The microclimates evident at many surface observation sites highlight the influence of land surface characteristics on local surface heating trends. Temperature and equivalent temperature trend differences from 1982- 1997 are examined for surface sites in the Eastern U.S. Overall trend differences at the surface indicate equivalent temperature trends are relatively warmer than temperature trends in the Eastern U.S. Seasonally, equivalent temperature trends are relatively warmer than temperature trends in winter and are relatively cooler in the fall. These patterns, however, vary widely from site to site, so local microclimate is very important.

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